A Swedish Easter

Second of April already! And if anyone fooled me yesterday cos of April Fools I wouldn’t have even noticed. Life is keeping me busy as I wrap up things in the studio (don’t worry we will still be open) to head off to Sweden on a working holiday with my small ones (yes my partner is joining us for a short stay so I guess that will be the holiday bit)…

It has been too many years since I have celebrated Easter the Swedish way and I am excited about experiencing the beautiful Swedish spring – Seeing the long dark winter turn into brisk sunny days and trees empty of leaves come to life. Funnily enough I’m flying from the Australian autumn where days are far warmer than the spring days to come…

As before any trip I am guilty of working too many hours in the lead up and have almost forgotten decorate for Easter!  I am feeling torn whether I should embrace the colourful-pastel-feather Easter for my children or let them celebrate more in their mummy’s way. That’s why I felt such an ease coming across these paired back images from Pella Hedeby & Marie Ramse who decided to do a totally white Easter.

 

Swedish Easter Swedish Easter Swedish Easter Swedish Easter

With unpainted eggs, wrinkly linen cloth and clear glass jars they have created the perfect pared back look softened with light wood details. The wooden crate filled with eggs is a casual nod to Easter without going overboard with colour and I love the clever styling of the reversed canvas on the wall with dark photographs pinned inside.

Celebrating in a simple way is beautiful especially when you have young ones as it lets you focus on being in the moment.

Photography: Sara Medina Lind
Styling: Pella Hedeby and Marie Ramse

In Detail

h HB HB2

I’m so intrigued by Swedish Stylist and Art Director Hans Blomkvist latest book In Detail which I recently picked up.

Hans unique and distinctive take on styling can be seen on every single page with his inspirational take on revealing the potential in even the humblest of objects (which I so love!)

The way Hans has used a branch to create a mood board is so inspiring and something    I love to do. The depth of texture in his styling where he cleverly used botanical illustrations and Japanese postcards is absolutely personal and beautiful isn’t it?

The book illustrates the elements Hans think are essential to a beautiful home by concentrating on the details, “Some people like to look at the bigger picture first but I’m the opposite I always start with a detail.” I like to do the same thing, using small elements as a starting point for creating a theme rather than starting with the bigger pieces. The elements he uses are often natural objects, plants, linen and rough surfaces. He believes that all these in combination with meaningful items are what make a home welcoming & personal and I couldn’t agree more.

When Hans styles, no matter if it’s for his home or in his work, getting the details right is the key to achieving the perfect look. For Hans the success of an entire room can hinge on one seemingly insignificant element which makes the whole room come to life and he has certainly nailed it.

HB3 HB4

All images scanned from Hans Blomquist’s new book In Detail published by Ryland Peters & Small.

 

Love Warriors

Image from Residence Magazine Styling Sara N Bergman of Love Warriers Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 1

I just have to share this perfectly imperfect styled Stockholm studio space I recently read about in Residence Magazine…it belongs to Swedish Illustrator Sara N Bergman, who is also the creative behind Love Warriors (a styling and photography agency based in Sweden) and is photographed by Kristofer Johansson…

I just love the eclectic mix of rough exposed brick walls, white tiles with black grout and smooth concrete flooring. The Blackish vintage chairs, white sofa covered with grey sheepskins and the delicate photography of the 3 Love Warriors of the world (No 1, No 2 and No3) are so perfect together! The skillful combination of Tribal elements, classic black and white photography and industrial accents has a decidedly Nordic & Scandinavian feel.

Image from Residence Magazine Styling Sara N Bergman of Love Warriers Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 2

This industrial locker works as storage but also as an inspirational mood board… while the large brown pots & baskets stacked on top remind me of my fondness for vintage browns and tribal details.

Image from Residence Magazine Styling Sara N Bergman of Love Warriers Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 3

What was once a mechanics workshop is now a homely creative space. There is so much texture and detail and yet it doesn’t feel the least bit cluttered…just comfortable, inviting and interesting…Every corner filled with little curiosities!

Image from Residence Magazine Styling Sara N Bergman of Love Warriers Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 4

By the nature of Sara’s work – there are many illustrations, artworks and photographs adorning the walls and table tops.

Image from Residence Magazine Styling Sara N Bergman of Love Warriers Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 5

To accompany the artworks are Sara’s collections – like these rustic pottery pieces and folded linen. For me this space personifies Sarah and her eclectic style. She is this space and this space is her. I admire the intrinsic link between her and her environment. Her dedication to making this space her own is admirable.

Images from Residence Magazine Styling Sara N Bergman of Love Warriers Photography Kristofer Johnsson

Christmas Traditions Old + New

Image from Weekend Carnival Styling and Photography by Riikka

Image from Lotta Agaton

Image from Johanna Vintage Styling And Photography Johanna

Christmas is sneaking up again and for those of you who know me, you know that I am not really into a big Christmas tree kind of celebration. This is partly because Christmas in Australia where it’s 40 degrees is very different to celebrating Christmas at home in Sweden where it is -5 degrees and dark for most of the day! It is also because I prefer not to buy commercial decorations and presents…instead I like to recreate the happy memories from my childhood for my children. For me the traditions behind Christmas are far more important than the tree and the presents.

For my family and friends I like to create an Australian Christmas with a Nordic twist. Our front garden becomes the dining room with a long table on the lawn for us to all eat together. My sheep skins are laid on the chairs and stools, and fresh herbs from the garden are used on the table as decoration. I also like to decorate indoors with cuttings from the garden, using washi tape to hang them on the walls and tucking them into my gift wrapping. These simple touches of green remind me of a Christmas tree without actually needing to have a 3m tall real tree taking over our lounge room!

In terms of more traditional decorations – I have a 7 arm candle light positioned to light up one of our front windows. I know it may not be to everyones liking but for me it adds atmosphere and warmth making our home feel inviting and welcoming. Our main Christmas tree is a birch tree (of course!) and it brings me so much enjoyment to see the kids playing with the decorations! We also have a mini, real Christmas tree placed in a copper vase. Having two small children we feel this enough for them to appreciate and enjoy.

For my family it works to keep Christmas simple, I will decorate our table on the 24th and am really looking forward to watching it come to life when our family and friends join us to celebrate the year that has been and the one that is yet to come! I thought that I would share a few festive styling images with you that strike the perfect balance of paying homage to my heritage and also to my home here in Australia. I hope you enjoy them and that they inspire you!

Merry Christmas – Lollo

Image from Angel At My Table

Image from Seventy Nine Ideas Styling Glen Probestel

Image 1 from Weekend Carnival. Styling and Photography Riikka / Image 2 from Lotta Agaton / Image 3 from Johanna – Vintage / Image 4 from Angel At My Table  / Image 5 from Seventy Nine Ideas. Stying Glen Probestel

Guest Post By Gemma: Decorating For Christmas

Images from Elle Decoration Sweden Styling Emma Persson Lagerberg Photography Petra Bindel 1

Images from Elle Decoration Sweden Styling Emma Persson Lagerberg Photography Petra Bindel 2

Christmas is fast approaching and all of a sudden there is a wonderful festive feeling in the air! I could spent hours looking at all the beautiful Christmas styling images coming from Sweden. This series of photos in particular – featuring gorgeous green decorations and styled by Emma Persson Lagerberg caught the eye of all us here at Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor!

Images from Elle Decoration Sweden Styling Emma Persson Lagerberg Photography Petra Bindel 3

At first glance these scenes seem wonderfully simplistic with a mix of natural materials, tones and textures. It is not until you take a closer look that you see the intricate details of each element, from the moss covered table top to the layered bunting that looks like it could have been hand made from wallpaper.

Images from Elle Decoration Sweden Styling Emma Persson Lagerberg Photography Petra Bindel 4

Images from Elle Decoration Sweden Styling Emma Persson Lagerberg Photography Petra Bindel 5

The sense of scale is quite playful with the tiniest of trees on the table top to the full size decorated Christmas tree. Along with the scale, use of colour is another feature of these displays. Emma’s careful placement of colour really stands out in these images. It immediately draws you in and is the common thread between all the settings.

Images from Elle Decoration Sweden Styling Emma Persson Lagerberg Photography Petra Bindel 6

For me these images bring back a little of the magic of Christmas from my childhood. Perhaps there will soon be some green walls in my home soon!

Images from Elle Decoration Sweden. Styling Emma Persson Lagerberg. Photography Petra Bindel.

 

 

One Home, Three Ways

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Tina Hellberg Photography Marcus Lawett

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Mikael Beckman Photography Marcus Lawett

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Hans Blomquist Photography Marcus Lawett

I’ve always found home staging – the clever art of styling a property to suit a potential buyer – absolutely fascinating, so I was excited to hear that a Swedish real estate agency, Fastighetsbyran, was experimenting with it. In fact, it’s all become quite scientific, which of course I love, considering my background in social work and psychology.

Can you believe, the living rooms pictured above are actually the same space? They’ve been styled and transformed by three of Sweden’s foremost creatives, based on a report from a design psychologist (yes, they exist) who said that home staging can help a property sell faster and for a higher price.

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Tina Hellberg Photography Marcus Lawett

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Mikael Beckman Photography Marcus Lawett

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Hans Blomquist Photography Marcus Lawett

The results are, as expected, incredible. Although each of the stylists came up with a totally different design scheme, they have all used clever tricks to make personal connections with a potential buyer.

My favourite design is by stylist Tina Hellberg, who has decorated the living room with a middle-aged single person in mind. She’s gone for a light, bright interior, with plenty of natural light flooding through the bare windows. The open-plan apartment has been cleverly zoned to create a living area, dining area and fireplace, which has been painted in a darker accent to create a focal point.

Tina’s opted for a mix of Scandinavian designer furniture pieces with sheepskin and tribal-pattern rugs, with natural wood here and there, for a comfortable, warm feel that tells a story of the person who lives here (without being too personal).

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Tina Hellberg Photography Marcus Lawett

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Mikael Beckman Photography Marcus Lawett

Image From Fastighetsbyran Styling Hans Blomquist Photography Marcus Lawett

I also love the room by art director and stylist Hans Blomquist (who has just released his second book, In Detail – a must buy). Hans has decorated the apartment for a couple with a child. He’s used clever touches to give the apartment a ‘lived-in’ feel without being cluttered – think green plants and firewood – and the natural light is sure to appeal to all the Scandinavians viewing the apartment!

Mikael Beckman –a stylist and creative director – has created a modern home with classic pieces for a middle-aged couple with no children. Mikael’s is probably the most typically Swedish of the interiors, with the all-white colour scheme brightened with patterned, colourful cushions. Warmth comes from the can chair and brass details, abundance of natural light and green plants. The living room has been well zoned off by a sheer curtain to allow privacy but without compromising on the light.

I love the results of this experiment by Fastighetsbyrån. It’s such a skill to be able to personalise a space with a potential buyer in mind. As every good estate agent knows, this is the key to selling a home!

Images from Fastighetsbyran. Photography  Marcus Lawett

Styling For Images 1,4,7 Tina Hellberg. Styling For Images 2,5,8 Mikael Beckman. Styling For Images 3,6,9 Hans Blomquist.

Pink Inspiration

Styling Pella and Marie Photography Kristofer

Styling Pella and Marie Photography Kristofer

Styling Pella and Marie Photography Kristofer 3

I never thought I’d be drawn to a home with pink accents, but this Swedish apartment styled by Pella Hedeby and Marie Ramse grabbed my attention from the moment I saw it. And yes, I love it. Of course, the pink used in this apartment isn’t a sickly sweet pink, but rather a sophisticated dusky nude pink. But even then, I’m surprised I love it; those who know me will know that I object to pink in any form, even for my two-year-old daughter Imogen!

This apartment, however, is the exception to the rule. It simply works. In the photographs taken by Kristoffer Johansson (of course), you can see that the pink wall is complemented by grey tones. The wall colours balance each other to create a totally new dimension to the apartment.

I usually style in odd numbers, but I love how the four black-and-white photographic artworks are positioned slightly under the black paint line. Rather than the graphic black-and-white photographs that Scandinavians are known for, Pella and Marie have used more subtle pictures to soften the interior design. Carefully positioned pendant lights and soft bent chairs also soften this structured, contemporary space.

Styling Pella and Marie Photography Kristofer 4

Styling Pella and Marie Photography Kristofer 5

Styling Pella and Marie Photography Kristofer 6

I’ve been obsessed with black lately, so you can see why the bedroom area appealed to me. The monochrome colour scheme could have been quite oppressive, but the clever stylists have added warmth and comfort with shrieked linen and layers of fabric. The kimono, photographic art work, the wall light and floor lamp give this space a very contemporary edge.

So am I convert to colour? Well, maybe not quite yet, but never say never!

Images from Hitta Hem Styling Pella Hedeby & Marie Ramse and Photography by Kristofer Johansson.

 

Form and Function

Annaleena Leino Clothes Rails 1

Annaleena Leino Clothes Rails 2

I fell in love with freelance stylist and designer Annaleena’s hand-forged clothing racks the moment I saw them, and I’ve been meaning to order one ever since. The minimalism and versatility really appeal to me – they strike the balance of form and function perfectly.

Annaleena Clothes Rails Image 3

Annaleenas Clothes Rail 4

Annaleenas Clothes Rail 5

In particular, I’ve got my eye on the rectangle hanger, available in both black and white. Although I’m in a black phase at the moment, I’m leaning towards the white rectangle hanger for my bathroom, which is painted and wallpapered in white, and features an old cast-iron bath and white, beach-cottage-style basin cabinet. The hanger would blend in  magically, giving a white-on-white, textured effect – especially if I contrast it with a handtowel or item of clothing. This hanger is just perfect for my small bathroom – I can utilise the height and position the hanger without having to waste valuable wall space.

Annaleenas Clothes Rail 6

How clever is this circle hanger? I love the fact that these hangers are hung from the ceiling rather than the wall – it makes them much more versatile, tidier and child friendly than the traditional freestanding hangers! I’ll put one of these in Imogen’s room, as the ladders I usually use for displaying her/my favourite clothing are definitely not safe for a climbing toddler.

For my studio, I will use a few of the black rectangular hangers to drape long drops of wallpapers directly off their roll. I’m moving to a new studio space soon, which is blessed with fantastic high ceilings, so I’ll finally be able to show off my wallpapers as I’ve always wanted to. The rails will look fantastic in the industrial-style space, with its concrete floors and raw concrete ceiling.

We’re going to be stocking all three models of Annaleena’s hand-forged clothing racks here at Scandinavian Wallpaper and Décor very soon! They’re easily installed by using screws and hooks or a ceiling hook. We’re here to help with installation if you get stuck, of course!

Images from Annaleena’s Blog.

Back In Black

Image from Fantastic Frank

Blame it on the rain, but I spent WA’s long weekend shuffling around the rooms in my house … again. And now that I have, I’m struck with an urge to paint the rooms all in black. Yes, black! After a lifetime of adoring white, I’m currently obsessed with and inspired by the colour black.

You can understand why, then, I was drawn to the daring and bold black-on-black styling of the entrance hallway in this third-floor, one-bedroom apartment in Stockholm. The 34-square-metre apartment was built in 1904, and the tall skirting boards and floorboards are all reflective of this period. As the apartment is for sale, it’s been cleverly styled by the creative team at Fantastic Frank, a real estate agent in Stockholm. The stylist decided that black was the colour to enhance the potential value of this gem, which boasts one of the most sought-after addresses in south Stockholm. I couldn’t agree more.

Image from Residence Magazine Photographed by Pia Uhlin and styled by Lotta Agaton

I am also in love with this light-hearted black-and-white hallway from the home of fashion stylist Sofia Ragnwald Odier and her husband, the fashion photographer Nils Odier. How great are the tongue-in-cheek white paint drips against the deep black wall? The vintage shoe nestled in amongst the couple’s shoes and accessories on the shelving unit from House Doctor (of course) adds to the organised clutter. Very cute. (Photographed by Pia Uhlin and styled by Lotta Agaton.)

Image from Vouge Paris Photographer Wichmann And Bendtsen Styling Helle Walsted

If I decide to not paint my entire home black, I’ll definitely be featuring a blackboard in a room (or two). If I used our magnetic chalk wallpaper instead, I could add photos and inspiring images for a whole new level of interest in either my bedroom, Imogen’s room or the home office. Look at the impact this blackboard wall makes in the spare bedroom/home office/dressing room of fashion designer Hanne Graumann … isn’t it just perfect?

Image 1. Image from Fantastic Frank. Image 2. Image from Residence Magazine. Photographed by Pia Uhlin. Styled by Lotta Agaton. Image 3. Image from Elle Decoration UK. Photographer Wichmann + Bendtsen. Styling Helle Walsted.

Seeing The World In Black And White

Design Therese Sennerholt Styling Lotta Agaton Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 1

For a while now I’ve been feeling a little more Aussie than the Swede I actually am. I’ve found myself saying “no worries” and “whatever”, and letting others take charge. I’ve been in the grey zone, where things are a bit softer and fluffier. Maybe motherhood has finally caught up with me!

However, my Scandinavian side has crept back in over the last few days, and I’ve suddenly felt more assertive. I have a lot more energy and focus, and feel the need to be more “black and white” – a very Swedish trait.

These new prints from super-talented art director and typographer Therese Sennerhold (a Swede, of course) suit my current mood perfectly. I can so identify with her mottos – particularly the one that says: “Life is color, but black and white is more realistic.”

The prints in the picture above are called “Grid” and “Simply Black”. I love the bold, clean lines and strong wording against the “Grid” design. It is simplistic, strong and striking at the same time!

Design Therese Sennerholt Styling Lotta Agaton Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 2

Therese creates graphic prints with new and old quotations and sayings, some of which she has found and others she has made up herself. How fresh is the pairing of “Monday Delight” with “Bold and Straight”, especially when contrasted with the softer angles of the blue light?

Design Therese Sennerholt Styling Lotta Agaton Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 3

The collection Shapes + Words includes pairs of prints, one featuring a phrase and one featuring a shape. Although they’re not sold together, they share a common denominator – whether a colour or a design – and they sit beautifully together.

With its grey tones, the top design, called “Playground”, softens the black-and-white graphic print (“No Perfection”). Saying that, the underlining of the words also softens “No Perfection” – or is that the clever styling, with the pastel shirt nearby?

Design Therese Sennerholt Styling Lotta Agaton Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 4

Therese has also produced striking postcards to complement her prints. I love the subtle inclusion of colour in the postcards … although that must be my Australian side creeping through again.

Design Therese Sennerholt. Styling Lotta Agaton. Photography Kristofer Johnsson.

Winter Warmers

Little Dandelion. Woolen Detail Jacqueline Fink Styling Glen Proebstel Photography Sharyn Cairns

That I am a big lover of wool is no secret. Coming from the Nordic countries, sheepskins and wool are a part of everyday life; we use them to stay warm, and also to add texture and a sense of cosiness to our interiors. I don’t just mean rugs, blankets and cushions, either. Winter boots, knitted jumpers and scarfs are all used as part of our decoration and styling – as well as to wear, of course!

Textiles Jacqueline Fink Cermamics  and Styling Lara Hutton Photography Sharyn Cairns Image 2

Textiles Jacqueline Fink Cermamics and Styling Lara Hutton Photography Sharyn Cairns Image 3

My home is full of sheepskin. I have Swedish woollen blankets, wool cushion covers (some of which I even use as wall art!), and felted wool ottomans that look like huge pebbles, which are my babies’ favourite playthings – and handy stools, too!

Textiles Jacqueline Fink Cermamics and Styling Lara Hutton Photography Sharyn Cairns Image 4

In winter, wool is the main staple in my wardrobe. I wear large, black, often masculine, knitted wool jumpers. Doesn’t matter whether they’re made in Scandinavia, New Zealand or Australia – so long as they’re made of wool, and beautifully designed. One of my favourite silk tops has a hand-tufted lining around the neckline and the bottom. I don’t travel anywhere without it. When not in use, I often have the knits displayed, just on hangers, around my house. It makes me feel at home.

Styling with wool is something that comes naturally to me, which is why I am very drawn to these images. I like the way all the textures are layered together to create an incredibly rich and interesting display. The industrial setting makes the perfect backdrop with its bare white walls and exposed concrete floor. The combination of the weathered wood, the earthy tones of the woollen textiles and the bleached white ceramics along with the occasional deep charcoal detail is so striking.

Textiles Jacqueline Fink Cermamics and Styling Lara Hutton Photography Sharyn Cairns Image 5

Jacqueline Fink from Little Dandelion is the creative mind (and hands) behind the wonderful, hand-knitted, oversized textiles shown in all these images. She uses naturally coloured, high-grade unspun wool from Australia and New Zealand to create bespoke woollen soft furnishings. You can tell that each one has been lovingly handmade. They have an incredibly tactile aesthetic – you just want to reach out and touch them!

Jacqueline also works on large-scale installations. These particular pieces are part of the Sea Art Collection, which was a collaborative project with like-minded stylist and ceramicist Lara Hutton.

Textiles Jacqueline Fink Cermamics and Styling Lara Hutton Photography Sharyn Cairns Image 6

Textiles Jacqueline Fink Cermamics and Styling Lara Hutton Photography Sharyn Cairns Image 7

Textiles Jacqueline Fink Cermamics  and Styling Lara Hutton Photography Sharyn Cairns Image 8

With their soft, muted tones, these pieces so versatile. You can easily imagine them being used as features in both residential and commercial settings. I could definitely see them in my home as I am in a coastal area, however I might have to wait until the kids are a bit older, as I know they wouldn’t be able to resist playing with them. And who could blame them? They’re so tactile that even I want to cuddle up with one!

Image 1: Wool Detail Jacqueline Fink. Styling Glen Proebstel. Photography Sharyn Cairns.

All Other Images: Textiles Jacqueline Fink Cermamics and Styling Lara Hutton  Photography Sharyn Cairns.

Guest Post: Style That Spans The Seas

Photographer and Stylist Line Kay Oslo Home Images from Femina Photography Yvonne Wilhelmsen

As Lollo’s offsider at Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor, I’m so excited to be guest blogging this week. My name’s Gemma, and I’ve been working with Lollo for the past year or so, in which time my love of Scandinavian design has grown to near-obsession levels.

There’s something about the Scandinavian design sense – the pared-back colour schemes, the minimalistic styling and the clever use of texture – that I really love. I think perhaps it’s to do with the fact that Australians and Scandinavians share similar passions – we both love natural light and nature, for instance, and this plays a big part in our styling.

When Lollo invited me to do a guest post I have to admit that I was a little bit nervous! With so many amazing Scandinavian interiors out there, how would I pick just one? I then stumbled across these images of this beautifully bright and airy home in Oslo, which belongs to the talented photographer and stylist Line Kay, of Vintage Piken.

So many things about this home resonate with me. The combination of whitewashed walls and floors, the light timber tones and occasional accents of grey and green create a wonderfully organic palette, which is enriched by the various woven baskets that appear throughout the home.

Photographer and Stylist Line Kay Oslo Home Images from Femina Photography Yvonne Wilhelmsen Image 2

The kitchen for me is the heart of the home. I love that the tones of the rest of the house are echoed in this assortment of kitchen accessories. I also really like the way that the small baskets have been incorporated as storage solutions. Not only are they practical, they also add a textural element, which is echoed in the woven light fitting.

Photographer and Stylist Line Kay Oslo Home Images from Femina Photography Yvonne Wilhelmsen Image 3

This open-plan living area also features a statement woven light fitting. The natural timber tones of the light, the rustic vessel on the main table and the small coffee table add the perfect amount of contrast in this otherwise bright, white space. It’s amazing how these wooden elements, with their natural tones, instantly make this space feel liveable.

Photographer and Stylist Line Kay Oslo Home Images from Femina Photography Yvonne Wilhelmsen Image 4

Photographer and Stylist Line Kay Oslo Home Images from Femina Photography Yvonne Wilhelmsen Image 5

The bathroom is perhaps one of my favourite rooms in this house. With exposed timber beams, a timber ceiling and a beautiful long timber shelf, it is a perfect continuation of the rest of the house. I like that there are decorative elements in the bathroom, as so often they are stripped away. The baskets, plant, artwork and even the soft grey flooring make the bathroom feel as bright and airy as the rest of the home.

Photographer and Stylist Line Kay Oslo Home Images from Femina Photography Yvonne Wilhelmsen Image 6

There is something about Line’s home that feels almost Australian, which I think is why it has really struck a chord with me. These photos are a good reminder that across the world, beautiful things happen inside the walls of people’s homes.

Images from: Femina. Photography by: Yvonne Wilhelmsen.

Expect The Unexpected

Copenhagen Residence Styling Camilla Tange Peylecke  Photography Peter Kragballe Image from Ruhemma Image 1

Every now and again I come across a Scandinavian home that catches my eye, as this one did. It’s refreshing to see a slightly different take on the traditional black-and-white, pared-back aesthetic we all know and love. That’s why this one-bedroom apartment in Denmark immediately grabbed my attention, with its rustic, warm tones and informal, minimalistic styling.

Tucked away in a backstreet of Copenhagen, close to the beautiful Botanical Gardens, the interior aesthetic of this apartment – with its earthy palette and raw materials – seems to echo its surroundings.

Copenhagen Residence Styling Camilla Tange Peylecke  Photography Peter Kragballe Image from Ruhemma Image 2

There is a tonal quality in the apartment that gives it a relaxed, warm feel. The dark wood of the kitchen complements the light, white space perfectly. When combined with industrial elements such as the steel pillar, concrete floors and wall lights and pendants, the interior feels just perfect.

Copenhagen Residence Styling Camilla Tange Peylecke  Photography Peter Kragballe Image from Ruhemma Image 11

I like that this apartment is minimal but not stark. There are no curtains or blinds – just sunlight beaming in through the large windows – no greenery, and very few accessories and nick-nacks; instead, teapots, coffee grinders, fresh flowers and branches in vessels and vases are used to add character. A blanket here and some cushions there add a touch of softness and comfort.

Copenhagen Residence Styling Camilla Tange Peylecke  Photography Peter Kragballe Image from Ruhemma Image 5

Copenhagen Residence Styling Camilla Tange Peylecke  Photography Peter Kragballe Image from Ruhemma Image 6

This is open-plan living at its very best. This large main room comprises an entry and hallway, a living room and the kitchen. In a space like this, the pressure’s on to get it just right – and in my opinion, it is!

Copenhagen Residence Styling Camilla Tange Peylecke  Photography Peter Kragballe Image from Ruhemma Image 7

Copenhagen Residence Styling Camilla Tange Peylecke  Photography Peter Kragballe Image from Ruhemma Image 8

Copenhagen Residence Styling Camilla Tange Peylecke  Photography Peter Kragballe Image from Ruhemma Image 9

Images from Rumhemma. Styling by Camilla Tange Peylecke. Photography by Peter Kragballe.

Finnishing Touch

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 1

As soon as I saw this Finnish summerhouse I had flashbacks of the many summer holidays I spent in Finland as a child with school friends and their families. Growing up, many of my friends and neighbours were Finnish, thanks to the working immigration of the 1960s, when many people left Finland to find employment in Sweden. As a result, I could easily converse in Finnish as a child, although I’ve forgotten most of it now, sadly.

What I haven’t forgotten is how to spot the difference between a Swedish and Finnish summerhouse. Yes, they’re both Scandinavian, and they both feature the characteristic white, bright interior, but there’s something a little more graphic and raw about Finnish interior design. The Finns’ use of black and exposed wood is more courageous. Perhaps it has something to do with the harsher, colder climate in Finland compared to its Scandinavian neighbours.

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 2

This summerhouse – on an island in the Finnish archipelago – was built by the owners. Tucked away amidst the mossy landscape, the home blends in beautifully with the natural forest. Measuring just 45 square metres, the property comprises the main house and a guesthouse. The left side of the house is the living area; the right side consist of a sauna – well, what would you expect in a Finnish summerhouse?

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 3

The kitchen nook is tiny and very simple, which would suit me, as most of my time would be spent outdoors. And of course no Finnish kitchen would be complete without potatoes – they’re part of every meal!

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 4

The main bedroom is characteristically white and bright. I love the use of white timber on the walls and ceiling – it somehow adds warmth in a stark room. And same materials and colours have been used for this bed which make it transparent and almost invisible!

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 5

Yes, the piles of wood are practical and essential, but to me, they look like an artwork in themselves. Isn’t the texture and the design just beautiful?

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 6

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 7

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 8

The must-have sauna has been positioned to make the most of the view. Enormous windows look out over the archipelago and create a feeling of tranquillity.

Finnish Summer House Image from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen Image 9

And look! What other type of placemat could possibly be used in a Finnish summerhouse than timber offcuts? With Marimekko plates on top, every meal would be a feast on this summer holiday.

Images from BoligLiv Photography Krista Keltanen

 

A Dream Swedish Home

Stylist Emma Persson Lagerberg Photos  Petra Bindel Source  Elle Interior Sweden Image 1

Stylist Emma Persson Lagerberg Photos  Petra Bindel Source  Elle Interior Sweden Image 2

I don’t think it’s any coincidence that the owner of this apartment in southern Sweden has the same name as my son, my father and my grandfather. It’s almost like I’m meant to live here!

This opulent, three-bedroom apartment is something very special. With its colossal decorative fireplace, parquetted floor and decorative ceiling mural, it’s soft, tonal and elegant. I’m not sure there’s anything here that I’d change.

The couple who live here – stylist Sara Persson Lagerberg and her partner Julius – have styled their home with second-hand and sentimental pieces alongside new and modern furniture and accessories. For instance, the black sofa and table were bought second-hand, while the grey sofa came from a previous home of Julius’. The end result is a home that is eclectic, surprising and completely perfect.

I love the pared-back styling. A mid-century black leather sofa with a backdrop of picture frames and a dress – topped off with an IKEA ceiling lamp – shouldn’t work, but it absolutely does! The stacked magazines and art add personality and a sense of homeliness to the apartment. This is what I mean when I say that houses should be homes, filled with personal pieces that tell a story about the owners.

Stylist Emma Persson Lagerberg Photos  Petra Bindel Source  Elle Interior Sweden Image 3

Stylist Emma Persson Lagerberg Photos  Petra Bindel Source  Elle Interior Sweden Image 4

As the home is painted primarily in white, the dining room is something of a surprise with its dark green walls. But again, it works, as it perfectly captures the feel of an English library. The decorative ceiling, parquetted floors and custom-made table and chairs by Piet Hein Eek – mixed and matched with other odd chairs, another ceiling lamp from IKEA and industrial shelving – complete the sophisticated, eclectic look, which I just adore.

Stylist Emma Persson Lagerberg Photos  Petra Bindel Source  Elle Interior Sweden Image 5

Stylist Emma Persson Lagerberg Photos  Petra Bindel Source  Elle Interior Sweden Image 6

Sara and Julius have cleverly converted their spare bedroom into a combined wardrobe/workspace. The giant ELFA hanging system showcases the couple’s clothing and shoes. Their contemporary apparel and the mid-century leather chair create a cool visual contrast to the heritage feature ceiling. This chair actually belongs to the sofa in the living room, but is perfectly suited to this space as it resonates with all the black leather shoes.

Stylist Emma Persson Lagerberg Photos  Petra Bindel Source  Elle Interior Sweden Image 7

Finally, a glimpse of the main bedroom which to me feels classically Scandinavian. It’s perfectly pared back, with neutral bedlinen, a sheer curtain to allow in as much natural light as possible (sunlight is very important to Scandinavians!) and white stacked boxes used as a bedside table. If I lived here, I don’t imagine I’d ever go out!

Stylist Emma Persson Lagerberg Photos Petra Bindel Source Elle Interior Sweden

Styling To A Tribal Beat

Image  from Teneues Photography Birgitta Wolfgang Drejer

I’m a devotee of Scandinavian design – that is no secret – but through my extensive travels and 14 years of living in Australia, I have been drawn to more eclectic styles. Make no mistake, I will always respect the graphic elements and black-and-white styling that characterise Scandinavian design, but when it’s combined with tribal soft furnishings, for instance, well, to me that is just perfect, minimal or not.

I love styling that incorporates ‘found’ items – eclectic pieces picked up on travels overseas, items inherited from family and friends. Anything that evokes special memories or brings a personal touch is, to me, what transforms a display house into a home.

Image from Malene Birger Image 2

So you can imagine my excitement at discovering that Danish-born designer and artist Malene Birger is not only launching a new studio project (Birger1962 in Copenhagen), but also a new book! What a treat to see inside her three homes and discover her design secrets.Malene Birger manages to get the balance of old and new just right – just look at how she’s used Arne Jacobsen’s classic black swan chairs alongside tribal pieces and contemporary furniture.

Image from Teneues Photography Birgitta Wolfgang Drejer Image 3 and 4

I love the classic composition of furniture in the left setting; the tribal components juxtaposed with the sleek industrial and deluxe. The earthy palette of warm reds and ochres soften the strong lines of the furniture and makes the space feel inviting and liveable. In the right setting, the classic black-and-white striped carpet beloved by Scandinavians is perfectly offset with an incredibly detailed and ornate antique dresser. It shouldn’t work, but it does!

Image from Teneues Photography Birgitta Wolfgang Drejer Image 5

What I love about Malene Birger is the way she handpicks beautiful pieces with so much character. For example, these intricate and mismatched lamps add so much beauty to this space. This bedroom epitomises Malene Birger’s eclectic Scandinavian style: strong black-and-white graphics, tribal art, and a classic portrait. What a perfect setting to kick back and enjoy her book. I wish it were mine!

Image 1 from Teneues. Photography Birgitta Wolfgang Drejer. Image 2 from Malene Birger. Image 3 -5 from Teneues. Photograhy Gori Salvà

 

Imperfectly Perfect Home Styling

Stylist Annaleenas Home Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 1

It might be the time of year, but just recently I’ve been looking for a little more for my interior design. I’m drawn to quirky and original home styling – a bit of sunshine on a rainy day! Perhaps that’s why this photo of freelance stylist and designer Annaleena’s ‘temporary home’ – an apartment in Stockholm – jumped out at me. It’s got the touch of quirkiness that so appeals to me.

I love how this brass lamp, a prototype of Annaleena’s own design, totally jumps out at you in this minimal, black-and-white space. Flooded with natural light, this stark white room is softened only by the rug. There’s a symmetry about this room that appeals to me, too: the black table with its carefully selected ornaments; the sheepskin draped over the sofa; the oversized black pot in the right window – all balanced out by the small black and white ornaments in the left window and the magazine holder hanging on the right wall. Did you think such seemingly simple home styling could actually be so clever and complex?

Stylist Annaleenas Home Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 2

As casual and as effortless as it may seem, every element of Annaleena’s home is carefully selected and positioned, from the fan and the leather tote bag to the industrial-style clothes rack (which I will soon be stocking at Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor!). In any other home they may seem like clutter, but in this setting they are imperfectly perfect!

Stylist Annaleenas Home Photography Kristofer Johnsson Image 3

I love the way Annaleena uses contrast in her interiors to create interest by offsetting strong, sharp lines with soft, organic forms. She’s a strong believer in the ‘less is more’ ethos; not just because it looks good, but because it enables her to display the things she enjoys the most – and it’s easier to find things, too!

Annaleena recently joined Residence Magazine, and I’m looking forward to following her blog and getting a glimpse into her ever-changing home and exciting new projects.

Styling Annaleena Photography Kristofer Johnsson

Into The Holiday Spirit

Sågverket Möten Rum & Kök Image from Fantastic Frank - Image 1

I’m finding it really difficult to get motivated at the moment. Working, decorating – even blog writing – all seem very hard to do right now. It took me a little while to figure out why, and then I realised: much of Europe is in Holiday Mode! For Swedish people, taking a holiday in July is entrenched, so naturally my body is also ready for that well-deserved break. Scandinavians really do get the balance of work and rest just right.

In the meantime, I’m daydreaming about a trip home to Sweden in a couple of months. I’ve been looking for a sophisticated yet simple place to stay with the children, and I came across this unbelievable family and pet-friendly hostel north of Sweden. It’s close to where my family and I stayed on holidays as a child, and it brought back so many happy memories as soon as I saw it. The hostel, which has its own vegetable and herb garden, is surrounded by bushland and is just a stone’s throw from the water, which has a jetty to swim from. It’s like a postcard!

Sågverket Möten Rum & Kök Image from Fantastic Frank - Image 2

Inside, the hostel is just as inspiring and nostalgic. The communal living space is open and inviting, with high ceilings and white beams for added character. A couch piled with cushions and sheepskins adds extra warmth. The Swedish really do know how to effectively use textures to create a homely, inviting décor.

Sågverket Möten Rum & Kök Image from Fantastic Frank - Image 3

Sågverket Möten Rum & Kök Image from Fantastic Frank - Image 4

The hostel has its own restaurant and café, which are similarly homely. Here they serve sustainable, locally grown food, and the atmosphere is just perfect for communal dinners with family and friends. I love the black SMEG fridge and the eclectic mix of chairs and kitchen sofas …. all perfect for a long, relaxing meal, Scandinavian style. The antlers add a quirky touch and remind me of the wild animals in the Swedish forest – I can’t wait to teach my children about them when they’re bigger. The white cotton pendant light is just divine and is a nice contrast to the tiles and timber.

Sågverket Möten Rum & Kök Image from Fantastic Frank

The attention to detail in this hostel is just amazing. I know my children will be drawn to this corner of the kitchen area, with its curious collection of nick-nacks. And how beautiful is this collection of vignettes? It all comes together to create the homely and peaceful feeling I am craving at the moment.

Sågverket Möten Rum & Kök Image from Fantastic Frank - Image 7

On the upper level of the hostel there’s an amazing bright, white room with spectacular views. What a perfect space to relax in with the children after a long day playing outdoors.

Sågverket Möten Rum & Kök Image from Fantastic Frank - Image 8

And then, when the day’s over, you can retire to the simple, pared-back bedroom with it’s soft, natural light. If I close my eyes I can almost imagine myself there …

Of course, it’s just wishful thinking for the moment. But what a lovely place to daydream about …

Images from Fantastic Frank

Decisions, Decisions

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Three years ago – before my home was taken over by babies and family life – I chose this adorable wallpaper for the room I used for reading, watching movies and relaxing. Since then the room has been the dining room, my bedroom, and most recently my two-year-old daughter Imogen’s bedroom. Although the room may have changed, the wallpaper has been a constant.

I love the graphic as well as the soft-greyish-white background – not that dissimilar from my favourite paint colour, First Snow! I guess the mural reminds me of Sweden, my home. You can see the graphic from the street, and I love people’s reactions when they walk or drive past and think I have a real tree growing in my house!

As this room now belongs to Imogen, I’ve decided I would like something different and perhaps a little more child-friendly on the walls. Although the wallpaper is one of Imogen’s favourites – she loves pretending to climb it and often sits beneath it to read her books – it’s time for a change.

But what to choose! I don’t want the wallpaper to be too girly and babyish, but I do want it to inspire her creativity. I must admit, I’m tempted to choose a new design with a repeat of pastel colours and watercolour effect so I can wallpaper the entire room.  Or why not a mural with an adorable deer designs to remind her of her Scandinavian roots? Then (wishful thinking for her), she could colour it in. This might discourage her from colouring in my sofa and the other white walls in the house!

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Image from Mini Willa 2

Image from Mini Willa 3

I’m also falling in love with the idea of using faux wood wallpaper, since being inspired by these black and white children’s rooms images from Mini Willa. Traditionally, classic stripes or pretty flowers have mainly been used in nurseries and toddler rooms, however so many contemporary children’s wallpapers have been released lately that I’m spoilt for choice.

Image from ZARA styling April and May photography James Stokes 2

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I’m also struck by these inspirational images from the Zara look book, styled by April & May. Aren’t they divine? I think they’ve nailed it, both in their choice of wallpaper and in styling. After seeing these I’m definitely leaning towards a white paper with textured effect, to keep the Scandi feel. This would give me the opportunity to decorate on top of the wallpaper, which is something I’m particularly fond of doing – I don’t like wallpaper to just be a feature on its own.

Last weekend a young couple came into the Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor studio looking for wallpaper for their son’s nursery, and settled on a faux brick mural. The winner of our recent competition also used her faux brick mural wallpaper in her son’s room. I think they’re trying to tell me something!

Sunday Times

Lollos Design Files Blog Post 5 Photographer Ida Lindhag Image 1

Lollos Design Files Blog Post 5 Photographer Ida Lindhag Image 2

On Sunday I found myself in a strange situation. Jason had taken the children to see his mum and I was left with five-and-a-half hours all to myself. If you’re a parent, you’ll know how unusual this is. So what did I do with my day? Go to the gym, or perhaps to a day spa? No – I chose to spend my ‘day off’ painting my office. To be honest, I was in a bit of a ‘mood’, and decorating is the best form of therapy that I know!

My office needs a restyle to transform it back into a creative space. For the last few months it’s been a bit of a white-on-white dumping ground, packed with wallpaper samples, props and other bits and bobs from second-hand shops and markets. Add to that my magazines, postcards and photos and it’s ‘organised chaos’, which I must admit that I do find quite comforting at times. For inspiration I couldn’t go past these incredible images from Danish artist Tenka Gammelgaard’s Studio in Copenhagen.

Lollos Design Files Blog Post 5 Photographer Ida Lindhag Image 3

The starting point with any room restyle is the walls. My office is the only room in my home that doesn’t have wallpaper – mainly because the paint I used when I first decorated the room had a sand finish, which I now know is impossible to wallpaper over. I haven’t let it beat me though! I’ve bought one of those ugly green doors from a warehouse, which I’ll cover with one of our magnetic wallpapers. Problem solved!

I’ve been obsessed with First Snow from Solvers Paint since I first came across it a few years ago, and was reminded of my obsession when I attended a fun workshop with Inside Out magazine recently. When my colleague Catherine pulled out a paint colour chart at work the other day she pointed out a lighter version of First Snow, which she’s using to decorate her newly built home. I was seriously tempted by this paint for my back room. It was more greyish-white than my current white colour and had that softness I really like.

But, with time at a premium, I went for the easier option: digging out the leftover paint from my last decorating ‘mood’. I think this was the right decision in the end, as using the same colour throughout the house has made it feel more connected.

Although my office was in desperate need of a fresh coat of paint, I was a little time-optimistic and obviously didn’t get the job done before Jason returned from his mum’s with Imogen and Julius. Not surprisingly there’s no time for painting when they’re around!

I did, however also manage to swap Imogen’s room with my bedroom over the weekend (this is something I have been considering for a while!) so she’s now better connected to the living room. It was a great idea: she can run and play freely between the two rooms, and she’s dragging a lot more of her toys out to play with now, which is nice.

Lollos Design Files Blog Post 5 Photographer Ida Lindhag Image 4

With one completed project and another under way, I now have a bit of a problem, although quite a nice one! You could describe my home as a bit of a work-in-progress, with lots of projects started but none completed and styled to the level that I’d like them to be. Now that I have started I feel really inspired to keep going so I’ll just have to pack Jason and the kids off to Grandma’s again next weekend!

Images from Danish artist Tenka Gammelgaard’s Studio in Copenhagen. Photographer Idha Lindhag

Rest, Work and Play

Private home south of Sweden featured in Residence Magazine Photography by Pia Ulin Styling by Lotta Agaton Image 1

Private home south of Sweden featured in Residence Magazine Photography by Pia Ulin Styling by Lotta Agaton Image 2

Winter’s arrived here in Perth and I’m keen to make my home cosier by swapping and restyling some rooms. Looking for inspiration, I started flicking through an issue of Residence magazine from 2013, and came across this story …

This is an inspiring home with so many DIY ideas, including the oversized pots in the outdoor area, as well as the sheepskin for added softness. Although my outdoor area has a coastal feel, a concrete pot with lavender would fit in nicely and also provide a lovely scent in the afternoon sun. As I am a big fan of sheepskin there are already plenty around the house – I might put a couple to good use on the weatherboard decking, so my eight-month-old son Julius has somewhere to play.

The dining area with the subway tiles is so on trend at the moment. The subway theme is being used not just in porcelain tiles, but also in wallpaper and murals, and I love it. I was also inspired by the antique sofa with grey sheepskin, the mix-and-match Hans Wegner chairs and the use of greenery. At the moment my dining area features a birch kitchen sofa (every Swedish kitchen has a sofa!), white Eames chairs and chrome pendants, although I am seriously considering calling my electrician to change my pendants to one of these striking wall-mounted lights instead. I’ve had my eye on them for a while …

Private home south of Sweden featured in Residence Magazine Photography by Pia Ulin Styling by Lotta Agaton Image 4

Private home south of Sweden featured in Residence Magazine Photography by Pia Ulin Styling by Lotta Agaton Image 5

Private home south of Sweden featured in Residence Magazine Photography by Pia Ulin Styling by Lotta Agaton Image 3

I love how this home has been designed for play and relaxation. See how the teepee and the hammock are integrated to create a relaxed and comfortable space with a modern feel? This makes me think I should swap my bedroom, which is near the living room, with my two-year-old daughter Imogen’s, so she can play freely between our living room and her room.

Speaking of my living room, that’s also in need of a restyle. I’m inspired by the studio light and the black-and-white photos; I’m thinking I might frame some cool but more child-friendly art to make the room more graphic and edgy – at the moment it’s very white and soft grey. And don’t tell my assistant, Gemma, but I’m tempted to ‘borrow’ the work studio’s black sheepskin to replace the grey one on my sofa at home …

Private home south of Sweden featured in Residence Magazine Photography by Pia Ulin Styling by Lotta Agaton Image 7

Final design inspiration comes from the home office. I really love the ‘grid’ – I think I’ll get one to replace the mood boards that are currently in my office. Here I can peg some of my favourite shots of my children with other inspiring images. My study is very white-on-white at the moment – broken up only by my grandpa’s wooden writing desk – so a black grid and a few black and white photos would make it less stark and more inviting. I’ll keep you updated on my progress!

Styling Lotta Agaton and photographer Pia Uhlin

Food for Nordic Thought

Private Dining Room Basement of Höst Image from Norm Architects - Image 1

Höst Worlds Best Design Restuarant Image from Norm Architects - Image 2

If you love Scandinavian design, chances are you’ll have already heard of the Danish company Norm Architects. They are a source of great inspiration to me in my work and in my personal life. For the past five years or so, these guys have been involved in residential architecture, commercial interiors, industrial design, photography, graphics and art direction – all in the spirit of traditional Scandinavian simplicity, of course.

Solitude at Hölst Image from Norm Architects - Image 3

New Norm Dinnerware for sale at Höst  Image from Norm Architects - Image 4

I’m completely infatuated with most of Norm Architects’ designs. Recently I was introduced to – and fell in love with – their dinnerware collection, designed for Danish design company Menu. It’s got a truly Nordic feel to it. And it seems I’m not the only one – the collection was so popular that the two companies teamed up with renowned Copenhagen restaurateurs Cofoco to create this amazing restaurant called Höst (Autumn).

Höst Dining Room Image from Norm  Architects - Image 5

Höst Restaurant  Image from Norm Architects

Höst Restaurant  Image from Norm Architects Image 2

Norm Architects have used recycled wood, industrial pendant lights and woollen blankets to create rustic Scandinavian dining rooms. These elements, in combination with minimalistic and sleek dining chairs and the specially designed, basic white tableware alongside blue and grey pieces and slabs of granite, capture the heart of Nordic design: it’s romantic yet modern, urban yet rural and rustic yet simplistic.

Pantry In The Cellar at Höst Restaurant Image from Norm Architects - Image 10

The food emphasises organic, locally produced Nordic cuisine, and the restaurant even has a jam and preserves cellar in place of the traditional wine cellar! In September 2013 Höst won The World’s Best Design Restaurant award at the annual Bar & Restaurant Design Awards in London. I’m not surprised! I am definitely paying a visit to this restaurant on my next trip to Scandinavia. I can’t wait.

Photographer Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen

A Life Less Cluttered

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Think of Scandinavian design, and what springs to mind is sleek, white minimalism. Which makes sense, as ‘minimalism’ as a design movement began in the Scandinavian countries in the 1950s.

Characterised by simplicity, minimalism and functionality, Scandinavian design is sometimes considered dull and lacking in personality – although I disagree, of course. Personally – and professionally – I naturally follow the ‘less is more’ motto in my styling and interior design.

When this design style is used in the correct way, the result is both striking and harmonious, creating a feeling of calmness and tranquillity. Although I must admit that I do sometimes tend to over-clutter with raw materials and textures as I am drawn to eclecticism as well as minimalism. More about eclecticism another time!

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What inspires me about minimalistic interiors is their understatement. A simple colour palette of black, white and/or grey, combined with raw, natural materials such as wood, concrete and wool, may look basic, but in fact has been created by someone incredibly skilled and talented.

One of my favourite stylists and bloggers, Pella Hedeby, has skilfully mastered this paired-back, Scandinavian style of minimalism. In her blog, Stil Inspiration, Pella shares all that inspires her in the way of interior design and architecture, including examples of her own work. Another blog, Hitta Hem, is where she and fellow interior designer Marie Ramse share more of their amazing projects.

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This apartment, styled by Pella and photographed by Kristofer Johansson, is an excellent example of a minimalistic space, full of personality. Warmth has been added by mixing different kinds of materials and using textured layers. Carefully chosen, contemporary pieces of furniture complement shaggy sheepskins. I also love the mood boards, black and white photographs, and statement lighting, which often feature in Pella’s work.

The result? A harmonious and well-balanced oasis, where light and dark hues illuminate the natural spectrum.

Northern Highlights

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So here it is! After seven years of running Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor, and a lifetime of being inspired by beautiful interiors and creative people, it’s time for me to finally share my design inspirations and personal style with the world … when I’m not busy running my business or looking after my two young children, that is.

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Naturally I am inspired by Scandinavian and Nordic designs, as that’s where my roots are. Scandinavia is well known as a hub of creative interior design talent. Perhaps it’s something to do with the lack of light and the cold temperatures, forcing people to stay indoors and transform their homes into something personal, functional and wonderful.

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This living room from the super-talented (and Swedish, of course!) Lotta Agaton’s home captures what I think Scandinavian and Nordic Design is all about: light, bright and white, with clean lines and striking symmetry. Look at the  balance between the graphic white and black softened by natural leather and greeneries. The approach is formal but the end result is casually comfortable.

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Photography by Pia Uhlin.
Stylist Lotta Agaton